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SPS Course Descriptions

Click on a course title below to view the course description.

Click on a course title below to view the course description.

ENGL 1311
Composition I
Course Description

This course is a laboratory-aided reading and writing-intensive course that focuses on a variety of strategies to generate ideas and create well-organized texts that is part of the required Core Curriculum. The course is designed to develop students' abilities in academic reading, writing, and oral communication, with the aim of enhancing critical reading skills, expository writing techniques, and critical think abilities.

ENGL 1312
Composition II
Course Description

This course is a laboratory-aided reading and writing-intensive course that teaches how to write a research paper on the college level over the course of one semester.  This course will provide practice for the development of a critical eye for argument as well as continued practice in developing logical, convincing, and persuasive arguments.

RELS 1325
Religious Quest
Course Description

Students examine definitions and elements of religion, explore the nature of the Sacred and human responses to the Sacred, and consider challenges to traditional religion in contemporary culture. Drawing examples from Christianity and other World Religions, students consider the roles and functions religion plays in human life and in society. This course fulfills the undergraduate UIW Core Curriculum requirement in Religious Studies. This course may not be repeated for credit.

DWHP 3300
Dimensions of Wellness
Course Description

The course emphasis is placed on helping students develop self-care abilities related to spiritual, physical, emotional, intellectual, social, and working wellness. This course requires the student to participate in two in-class aerobic workouts per week and the integration of lifetime sports and/or activities.

PHIL 1381
Introduction to Philosophy
Course Description

Students examine philosophical problems, methods, and areas of interest. Topics may include the nature of reality, theory of knowledge, the existence and nature of God, the idea of beauty, personal and social ethics, political philosophy, the mind-body problem, freedom and determinism, and personal identity. Note: PHIL 1381 is a prerequisite for all upper-division philosophy courses.

MATH 1304
College Algebra
Course Description

This is a three-hour course that covers algebraic operations, functions and functional notation; polynomial equations and inequalities; graphing techniques, graphs of polynomial and rational functions; logarithms and exponentials; and problems from the physical and social sciences and business.  This course serves as a prerequisite for MATH 1311.  It will not count as an elective for mathematics majors.

COMP 1301
Computer Literacy
Course Description

This course is an introduction to basic microcomputer terminology and concepts. The student receives hands-on experience in file management techniques, Internet and email software, online library software, word-processing software, presentation software and spreadsheet software with an emphasis in business applications. This course meets the computer literacy requirement for business majors and the University requirement for proof of computer competency. (Fall, Spring and Summer). Fee.

By the end of the second semester at UIW, students must successfully test for computer competence or complete a computer literacy course.

MGT 3340
Concepts and Functions of Management
Course Description

Introduction to the theories, concepts and functions of management. Topics include planning, organizing, leading, staffing, controlling, business and managerial ethics and decision making. Management concepts will be applied by analysis of available data and by seeking contemporary opportunities, issues and problem situations.

ACC 2300
Survey of Accounting Concepts
Course Description

An overview of the basic concepts of financial and managerial accounting. Students are taught how to prepare, read, and analyze corporate financial statements. Additionally, students are taught the tools and techniques necessary for managerial planning, controlling, and decision making. This course should not be taken by business administration majors.

ACC 2312
Managerial Accounting
Course Description

This course is an introduction to the fundamental concepts of managerial accounting appropriate for all organizations. Students will study information from the entity's accounting system relevant to decisions made by internal managers, as distinguished from information relevant to users who are external to the company. The emphasis is on the identification and assignment of product costs, operational budgeting and planning, cost control, and management decision making. Topics include product costing  methodologies, cost behavior, operational and capital budgeting, and performance evaluation.

Prerequisite
ACC 2311

ACC 3311
Intermediate Accounting I
Course Description

This course is a comprehensive study of current practices in business communications designed with a goal of teaching the principles of business communications to accounting majors who desire to become CPAs. topics include: communicating at work; communication, culture, and work; verbal and nonverbal messages; listening; interpersonal skills; interviewing; types of interviews; working in teams; effective meetings; developing the presentation; organizing your ideas; verbal and visual support in presentations; and delivering the presentation.

Prerequisite
ACC 2312

ACC 3312
Intermediate Accounting II
Course Description

In this course the student will go more in-depth of the accounting theory and special accounting problems. They will define components of a company’s current and non-current liabilities and apply the proper financial reporting requirements for a company’s assets. In addition they student will prepare the appropriate journal entries for bonds and long-term notes.

Prerequisite
ACC 2312

BIOL 1401
Diversity of Life and Laboratory
Course Description

This course studies the diversity of living organisms, structure and function of plants and animals, ecology, and evolution. It is designed for non-majors and serves as a laboratory science requirement for the core curriculum. Fee.

BIS 2325
Business Information Processing
Course Description

Concepts, methods, and practice in the effective use of end-user productivity software and integration of desktop products. Students will learn to create and utilize intermediate level Microsoft Excel and Access. This course concentrates on providing the instructions needed for understanding of Excel spreadsheet and Access database, and how to use it as a tool for management decision-making, problem solving and to gain strategic advantage.

Prerequisite
COMP 1301

BIS 2330
Computer Programming I
Course Description

Learn programming design and development emphasizing structured programming techniques. Learn to plan and create simple, useful program codes behind graphical user interfaces (windows) for use as standalone programs or applications macros. Learning programming reveals the type of coding behind all software and teaches logic and attention to detail.

Prerequisite
COMP 1301 and BIS 2321

BIS 3330
Computer Programming II
Course Description

Continuation of Programming Languages I with an emphasis on object-oriented programming methodologies and advanced language features: vehicle language Visual Basic.NET. This course is designed to practice Object-oriented software development approach, to Produce event-driven coding, algorithmic flow control, and data structure concepts. This course will illustrate software development technical concepts and vocabulary, and help students practice an environment for Team Learning.

Prerequisite
BIS 2330

BIS 3362
Business Systems Analysis
Course Description

This course will teach students to accomplish preliminary investigation, feasibility assessment, systems analysis and specification of business requirements for databases and information systems. This course is designed to enable student to analyze business problems and specify information systems solutions, to learn and be able to perform tasks and methods used in the entire Systems Development Life Cycle. It serves to familiarize students with development of feasibility study, data analysis, systems analysis, and systems/database specification.

Prerequisite
BIS 2321 and BIS 2330

BIS 3363
Introduction to Databases and Systems
Course Description

A continuation of topics introduced in BINF 3362. Students will have supervised experience in designing, developing, testing, documenting and implementing business databases and information systems. This course covers advanced topics in Systems Specification leading to systems design, including data normalization, object states, collaboration and responsibilities among objects, subsystems, subdividing a development project into separate pieces, and testing requirements.  The Object-Oriented paradigm is used in the course to integrate classic systems and database design and development.

Prerequisite
BIS 3362

BIS 3367
Introduction to Telecommunications
Course Description

Basic telecommunications terminology and concepts. Introduction to voice and data networks, including technology, hardware and software. This course intends to help the student identify the role of network layering and current standards, to recognize the major application architectures and applications that follow them, and to be familiar with the different types of network circuits and media, as well as understand how analog/digital data is transmitted with analog/digital signals.

Prerequisite
BIS 2321 and BIS 3362

BIS 4363
E-Business Solutions
Course Description

This course provides an introduction to electronic business strategy and the development and architecture of electronic business solutions and their components. This course intends to help the student identify the role of network layering and current standards, to recognize the major application architectures and applications that follow them, and to be familiar with the different types of network circuits and media, as well as understand how analog/digital data is transmitted with analog/digital signals.

Prerequisite
BIS 2321 and MGT 3340

BIS 4375
Information Security
Course Description

This course is designed to develop knowledge and skills for security of information and information systems within a business environment. It includes concepts and methods associated with people, software, hardware, methodologies and protocols. The course presents techniques for assessing risk associated in breaches of security. It covers different ethical uses of information and some legal considerations. This course intends to help the student develop knowledge and skills for security of information and information systems within a business environment.

Prerequisite
BIS 3367

CRIJ 1301
Introduction to Criminal Justice
Course Description

This course is an introduction to all of the parts that make up our criminal justice system. Students will study law enforcement, our judicial system, the criminal justice process, the law, criminal justice agencies and current issues.

CRIJ 1308
Criminalistics
Course Description

This course is an introduction to crime scene investigation. Students will learn the basic theories of criminalistics and how the application of the theory relates to criminal investigation.

CRIJ 1325
Criminology
Course Description

This course is a survey of why people, both adults and juveniles, commit crimes. Patterns in behavior as well as types of crimes will be examined in this course.

Prerequisite
CRIJ 1301

CRIJ 2303
Introduction to Homeland Security
Course Description

This course is designed to give Criminal Justice students a general idea about what Homeland Security is all about.  It is also a foundational course for students enrolled in the Homeland Security concentration.  The course exposes students to the origin of the Department of Homeland Security, its organizational structure, and the security strategies that the department employs to keep the homeland safe from both domestic and international attacks.  the course rethinks the September 9-11 attacks, its survivors, and shows how the 9-11 attacks and technological development have opened up the way for the shape the department has adopted in recent years.

CRIJ 2310
Criminal Law and Procedure
Course Description

This course is an overview of criminal law in the US. Students will study the principles of our legal system including liability, crimes against property, people, and society.

Prerequisite
CRIJ 1301 and 1325.

CRIJ 2313
Introduction to Corrections
Course Description

This course is an introduction to modern corrections. The course will look at the corrections practices currently in place, the role of corrections in our society, as well as how correction agencies function.

Prerequisite
CRIJ 1301 and 1325.

CRIJ 2328
Law Enforcement
Course Description

This course is an introduction to the role police play in our criminal justice system. It includes a historical survey of policing, the role of the modern police officer, as well as current issues in policing.

Prerequisite
CRIJ 1301 and 1325.

CRIJ 2333
Juvenile Justice
Course Description

This course examines the issues concerning minors in the criminal justice system. The legal ramifications for courts, corrections, probation, police and reasons for criminal acts will be explored.

Prerequisite
CRIJ 1301 and 1325.

CRIJ 3300
Public and Private Security
Course Description

This course examines the basic problems, procedures, and needs in the field of security work including a comparison of private agencies, schools, hotels, retail and industrial enterprises which handle their own security with private and public security organizations. Emphasis is given to the role of private, industrial, and business security systems and their relationship to the criminal justice system.

Prerequisite
CRIJ 1301 and 1325

CRIJ 3315
Legal and Ethical Issues in Criminal Justice
Course Description

This course aims to provide criminal justice students with the fundamental legal, moral, and ethical issues in the United States Criminal Justice System.  Students are exposed to the strengths and weaknesses of the US justice system.  The use of discretionary powers by personnel in the ethical issues involved in the fight against contemporary crime in the global world.  The course serves as an eye opener to the use, misuse and limitations of power in the justice system.  News making cases are reviewed.

CRIJ 3330
Race, Gender, Ethnicity and the Law
Course Descriptions

This course explores the criminal justice systems and deals with differences in race, class, gender, and ethnicity. Students will learn about victimization, as well as crime, apprehension, prosecution and punishment as it relates to these differences.

Prerequisite
CRIJ 1301 and 1325.

CRIJ 3335
Civil Liability
Course Description

This course will expose students to civil liability issues at the local, state, and federal law levels. Students will develop better awareness of the liability risks relative to criminal justice service. They will learn proactive protocols that may minimize personal and organizational liability risks..

Prerequisite
CRIJ 1301 and 1325.

CRIJ 3340
Victimology
Course Description

This course examines the issues concerning minors in the criminal justice system. The legal ramifications for courts, corrections, probation, police and reasons for criminal acts will be explored.

Prerequisite
CRIJ 1301 and 1325.

CRIJ 3360
Criminal Justice Administration
Course Description

This course examines the organizational structure of criminal justice organizations. Students will learn the fundamentals of management and organization structure of a variety of different types of criminal justice agencies. Students will learn what makes the organizational structure of criminal justice agencies unique from other private and/or public agencies.

Prerequisite
CRIJ 1301 and 1325.

CRIJ 3370
Criminal Justice Research Methods
Course Description

This course will introduce the student to research used in criminology and criminal justice. It will explore the nature of scientific inquiry, issues in research methods, and statistical concepts and allow for a critical examination to assess the design, results, and conclusions of quality research in criminal justice.

Prerequisite
CRIJ 1301,1325, 2310, 2313, 2328, 2333. and 3360

CRIJ 3380
Criminal Investigation
Course Description

This course is designed to familiarize the student with crimes against person and property and the investigation procedures used for successful prosecution: computer and technology, collections of evidence, report writing, interviews, techniques, and law and court testimony.

Prerequisite
CRIJ 1301 and 1325.

CRIJ 3390
Terrorism and Homeland Security
Course Description

This course will explore the historical and philosophical foundations of terrorism and defined through typologies and motivations associated with such criminal acts and behaviors. It will review acts of terrorism and discuss how law enforcement and security processes have responded through law and criminal interdiction.

Prerequisite
CRIJ 1301 and 1325.

CRIJ 4300
Corporate Crime and Deviance
Course Description

This course will provide an examination and analysis of the phenomena of organized and white collar crimes and efforts to control it. Attention will be paid to criminal organizations, including but not limited to government agencies, corporations, and corrupt individuals.

Prerequisite
CRIJ 1301 and 1325

CRIJ 4305
Cyber Crimes
Course Description

This course introduces the fundamental principles of computer crime and investigations. Topics include crime scene/incident processing, information gathering techniques, data retrieval, collections and preservation of evidence, preparation of reports and court presentations.

Prerequisite
CRIJ 1301 and 1325.

CRIJ 4320
Sex Crimes
Course Description

This course examines the range of crimes from exhibitionism to the most serious sexual crimes. Students will study the causes, impact and treatment possibilities for perpetrators.

Prerequisite
CRIJ 1301 and 1325.

CRIJ 4340
Women in Criminal Justice
Course Description

This course provides an overview of issues surrounding women and crime: as offenders, victims, and criminal justice system professionals. Students will analyze changing social views of women and women's roles, and the impact of feminism and affirmative action policies. Topics will include theories on female crime; the implications of social class and race in female offending; the ways in which women are processed through the criminal justice system; patterns of female victimization; and the roles of women in law enforcement and corrections.

Prerequisite
CRIJ 1301 and 1325

CRIJ 4390
Concepts in Self-Defense
Course Description

This course will familiarize the student with theories and concepts in fear management, predator-prey dynamics, performance enhancement psychology, and conflict management strategies that enhance survivability in both personal and professional domains.

Prerequisite
CRIJ 1301, 1325, 2310, 2313, 2328, 2333, 3360, 3370, and 4380

CRIJ 4380
Capstone in Criminal Justice
Course Description

The capstone course allows students to demonstrate their knowledge across the discipline of criminal justice. Students will demonstrate their knowledge integrating theory, concepts and decision making in a culminating project.

Prerequisite
CRIJ 1301 and 1325.

CRIJ 4395
Internship in Criminal Justice
Course Description

This experience involves a minimum of 100 contact hours in a position that affords the student an opportunity to learn practical applications in the criminal justice field. It consists of one term of supervised service in a criminal justice agency.

Prerequisite
CRIJ 1301, 1325, 2310, 2313, 2328, 2333, 3360, 3370, and 4380

ECN 2300
Survey of Economics
Course Description

This course presents students with an overview of economic theories, historical development and current applications.  Students are introduced to terms, definitions, policies and philosophies of economics.  Students will be exposed to macro and microeconomic concepts

ECN 2301
Macroeconomics
Course Description

Macroeconomic theories provide simplified descriptions of the national economic system.  Theories include the Circular Flow Model, Theory of Comparative Cost Advantage, Theory of Aggregate Demand and Aggregate Supply, and Supply-Side Economics.  Graphing skills as a “language” used to communicate theories.  Students develop skills in using theories to understand and critique Federal fiscal and monetary policy.   Other topics include international trade, economic growth, business cycles, and fiscal policy and monetary policy.

ECN 2302
Microeconomics
Course Description

Analysis of the behavior of individual economic agents, including consumer behavior and demand, producer behavior and supply, price and output decisions by firms under various market structures, factor markets, market failures, and international trade. Market theory includes demand, supply, price/quantity equilibrium, and changes in equilibrium.  Elasticity of demand.  Efficiency, distribution and production costs.  Market structures include Pure Competition and Monopoly, and an evaluation of their effects on society taking into account both efficiency and distribution.  Resource markets include wage determination.

Prerequisite
ECN 2301

FIN 3315
Financial Modeling
Course Description

This course studies the process of using electronic spreadsheets to analyze and evaluate business decision alternatives. The focus will center on the use of spreadsheets to develop financial models to solve business problems such as capital budgeting, pro forma financial analysis, time value of money and investment analysis.

Prerequisite
COMP 1301 and ACCT 2312

FIN 3321
Business Finance
Course Description

Basic financial concepts employed by management. Emphasis is on the decision-making processes followed by corporate financial managers. Students will understand and apply the topics include the time value of money, financial planning, capital budgeting, cost of capital. The course is designed to introduce students to theories and practices of financial management, specifically: analyzing financial statements, time value of money, stock and bond valuations, and capital budgeting.

Prerequisite
ACCT 2312, ECN 2301, ECN 2302, and MATH 1304

FIN 3322
Intermediate Business Finance
Course Description

Examination of financial theory and practice. Case studies are employed to understand the application of concepts and theories to practical situations. This course stresses the application of the basic financial concepts in solving practical, real world corporate financial problems and dealing with the tasks associated with long and short-term financial planning.

Prerequisite
FIN 3321

FIN 3325
Financial Markets
Course Description

Examination of the financial and economic issues facing a non-profit organization including the time value of money, grant development and fund raising, loans, cash management and planning and budgeting. The students will be able to understand the processes and roles of intermediaries involved in financial transactions, demonstrate financial tools for investment analysis, study the financial markets and structures of interest rates, and understand the Federal Reserve System.

Prerequisite
FIN 3321

FIN 3355
Global Finance Markets
Course Description

International business transactions, sources of funding, relationship with international financial institutions and capital instruments. Relates international business funding to national and commercial development. The course is designed for those students who want to learn about international financial transactions and how to hedge against risk in those transactions.

Prerequisite
FIN 3321

FIN 4355
Capital Budgeting Analysis
Course Description

This course is designed to develop knowledge and skills for security of information and information systems within a business environment. It includes concepts and methods associated with people, software, hardware, methodologies and protocols. The course presents techniques for assessing risk associated in breaches of security. It covers different ethical uses of information and some legal considerations.

Prerequisite
ACC 2312 and FIN 3321

GOVT 1315
American Politics
Course Description

This survey of U.S. national government. It is designed to provide the student with an understanding of the foundations, constitutions and processes of their national government. The major institutions of the national government are examined in order to gain an understanding of how they work, the role of the people in the political system and the consequences of a democratic political system. The success (and lack thereof) of some groups to influence government and obtain benefits from it are considered in an effort to evaluate the workings of a democratic system.

HRES 3330
Human Resources and the Law
Course Description

This course presents the laws that organizations must comply with in order to implement policies, procedures and fair employment practices when making decisions about people, at different stages of the employment cycle, including: hiring, assessing performance, promotions, compensation and termination.

Prerequisite
BMGT 3340 and BMGT 3354.

HRES 3350
Staffing
Course Description

This course presents the research and practice relevant to staffing an organization, including: sourcing, recruiting, pre-employment selection testing, interviewing, legal issues and job placement.

Prerequisite
HR 3330.

HRES 3360
Training & Development
Course Description

This course presents the research and practice relevant to training and development in organizations, including: needs analysis, design, development, implementation and evaluation of training and development programs.

Prerequisite
HR 3330.

HRES 3370
Compensation and Benefits
Course Description

This course presents the research and practice relevant to compensation and benefits, including: reward strategies, pay models, designing pay levels and structures, job evaluation, legal issues, benefit options, and international pay systems.

Prerequisite
HR 3330.

HRES 3380
Performance Management
Course Description

This course presents the research and practice relevant to managing performance in the workplace, including: establishing and aligning goals and objectives, developing and setting performance standards, providing performance feedback, conducting performance appraisals, legal issues, and planning developmental opportunities.

Prerequisite
HR 3330.

HRES 4350
Leadership in Organizations
Course Description

This course presents the research and practice relevant to leadership in organizations, including: theories of leadership, leadership styles, leadership roles and activities, and skills necessary for effective leadership.

Prerequisite
HRES 3340 and BMGT 4355. Cross-listed with ORGD 4350.

HRES 4380
Capstone in Human Resources
Course Description

This is the final course for the BA in Human Resources. It is an integrative, problem-solving course in which the expertise gained in the major is applied to organizational situations through actual project work or case studies.

Prerequisite
Completion of all other major requirement for the Bachelor of Arts in HR. ORGD 4380

HSCI 2310
Health Sciences I
Course Description

This course is a survey of math and chemistry concepts as related to the health sciences. The first half of the course will emphasize basic mathematical definitions and concepts. The second half of the course will emphasize chemistry topics related to the health sciences to include the basics of inorganic, organic, and selected biochemical concepts.

Prerequisite
BIOL 1401

HSCI 2312
Medical Terminology
Course Description

Medical Terminology is designed to familiarize the student with the language of medicine. The components of medical terminology are highly beneficial for any individual with a healthcare employment objective. The course presents the components of medical words including word roots, combining forms, suffixes, and prefixes. Using medical terminology as a focal point, the systems of the body are discussed.

HSCI 2315
Medical Coding
Course Description

This course provides entry-level training in medical coding. Students will develop and understanding of Current Procedural Terminology 4 (CPT-4), International Classification of Diseases (ICD-9-CM) Volumes I and II, HCFA Common Procedure Coding System (HCPCS), as they are used in medical claims processing and record management.

HSCI 2317
Medical Insurance Practice
Course Description

This course teaches procedures for completing insurance claims and various financial methods used in medical offices for insurance billing, collecting, and records processing.

HSCI 2320
Health Sciences II
Course Description

This course is a survey of the fundamentals of anatomy and physiology for the health sciences. The topics include: the language of medicine, organization of the body, cellular foundations, and tissues and membranes. The body systems include: skeletal, muscular, integumentary, cardiovascular, lymphatic and immune, respiratory, nervous, sensory, endocrine, gastrointestinal, urinary, and reproductive.

Prerequisite
HSCI 2310

HSCI 2327
Introduction to the Electronic Health Record
Course Description

This course will provide students with an overview of all the information entered into and extrapolated from an electronic health record (EHR). Students will examine specific sections of the EHR in relation to health information management. Topics included in this course are information storage and imaging, organizing data exchanges through web databases, and real-time data collection.

HSCI 2330
HIPAA Compliance and Certification
Course Description

This course provides an easy-to-understand overview of the Health Information Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) privacy and security rules and compliance tasks. The student will be able to summarize the analysis, training, and technology needed to properly plan and implement privacy and security policies. Some of the topics discussed in this course are information on what HIPAA is, what is required, what the student can do to work toward compliance, and how the student can maintain compliance on an ongoing basis.

HSCI 2340
Information Technology and Systems
Course Description

A foundation of electronic health record terminology and the information systems life cycle is explored. The important basis upon which successful HER implementation must rely - project management, strategic planning, and migrations from the current state are discussed. Skills in selecting, negotiating for, implementing and operating the electronic health record and its corresponding databases are developed. The use of data dictionary, data models, database management and design for electronic health records are introduced.

HSCI 3305
Basic Cardiac Rhythm Interpretation
Course Description

Basic Cardiac Rhythm Interpretation is designed to enable students to interpret basic cardiac rhythms in healthcare related settings. Heart anatomy, physiology, dysrhythmia interpretation and treatment will be presented

HSCI 3310
Healthcare Organizations and Administration
Course Description

This course provides students with the opportunity to learn leadership competencies and identify opportunities in public and private healthcare sector. The course is designed to introduce students to the medical personnel, institutions, and health care delivery systems that they will inevitably encounter while practicing in a variety of types of actions, including medical malpractice, personal injury, workers , products liability, and age and disability discrimination. The course provides an introduction to the competing needs of the providers and the payers and how these two systems interact with one another. The student will be engaged in discussions of various common practice structures (including fee for service, RBRVS, Capitation, HMOs, PPOs and Medicare/Medicaid), and a summary of antitrust constraints on medical providers. This course also includes a policy-oriented discussion of the future of health care delivery and financing.

HSCI 3315
Introduction to Administrative Medical Assisting
Course Description

Topics include the history and development of the medical profession and its specialties; the role and function of the medical assistant and medical assisting organizations; principles of interpersonal relationships; professional attitudes; medical ethics and law; interactions with patients; and overview of basic functions carried out in a medical office, e.g., medical records, patient appointments, billing for services.

HSCI 3317
Healthcare Communication
Course Description

This course presents theory and research in health communication. Topics include interaction between parties and providers, communication in health care organizations, privacy and confidentiality, health care campaigns, and cultural meanings of health and illness.  Include the history and development of the medical profession and its specialties; the role and function of the medical assistant and medical assisting organizations; principles of interpersonal relationships; professional attitudes; medical ethics and law; interactions with patients; and overview of basic functions carried out in a medical office, e.g., medical records, patient appointments, billing for services.

HSCI 3310
Healthcare Organizations and Administration
Course Description

This course provides students with the opportunity to learn leadership competencies and identify opportunities in public and private healthcare sector. The course is designed to introduce students to the medical personnel, institutions, and health care delivery systems that they will inevitably encounter while practicing in a variety of types of actions, including medical malpractice, personal injury, workers , products liability, and age and disability discrimination. The course provides an introduction to the competing needs of the providers and the payers and how these two systems interact with one another. The student will be engaged in discussions of various common practice structures (including fee for service, RBRVS, Capitation, HMOs, PPOs and Medicare/Medicaid), and a summary of antitrust constraints on medical providers. This course also includes a policy-oriented discussion of the future of health care delivery and financing.

HSCI 3320
Healthcare Data Management
Course Description

Analysis of healthcare data management theories focusing on the role of the Health Information Manager will be covered in this course. Managing processes for health data structure and content for compliance with standards, regulations, and accreditation is covered. Developing strategies for changing from a paper-based to electronic record is practiced.

HSCI 3321
Information Systems for the Health Sciences
Course Description

This course is an overview of basic concepts in medical and health care informatics. These core concepts include an introduction to the foundational theory and practical application of clinical decision making; computerized decision support; health care systems and their organization; the special issues of administration, security, and operations of imaging informatics; tele-health technology; public health informatics; standards, terminologies, and the uniqueness of biomedical data; and a special focus on emerging technologies. This course includes an introduction to fundamental concepts in bioinformatics and introduces students to the data that is being managed, databases where this data resides, knowledge bases which are used to associate concepts with each other, and tools of analysis of this data.

HSCI 3330
Legal Issues in Healthcare
Course Description

This course provides the student with an understanding of law, regulation, and court decisions that affect healthcare organizations as well as the ethical underpinnings and principles that healthcare organizations follow in the delivery of services. A review of contemporary key federal and state laws is provided, including regulatory; scope of practice for practitioners; privacy and confidentiality of patient information; patient protection including advanced directives, right to die, informed consent, malpractice, content of and access to patient records; organizational liability; apparent agency liability; fraud and abuse; safe harbor; conflict of interest legislation; anti-trust law; contract law governing relationships with employed physicians and other providers; risk management; and organizational governance issues. Key ethical principles underpinning healthcare organizations will be considered as will recent court decisions that impact healthcare organizations and management roles.

HSCI 3340
Third Party Payment Systems
Course Description

This course includes the history of healthcare systems in the United States. The emphasis is on insurance systems including quasi insurance systems like PPOs. Emphasis is placed on the history of various payment systems such as FFS, RBRVS, DRGs, and how each of these systems impact traditional insurance systems, HMOs, PPOs, and POS systems. This course will also explore the differences between fully-funded insurance and self-funded insurance systems. Students will also learn about various public insurance systems including Medicare, Medicaid, and Tricare systems. Discussion on how health insurance systems impact the providers systems like hospitals and physicians by employing peer review, utilization management and other systems to influence behavior changes. Discussion will center on how a various insurance systems interact with various stakeholders including regulatory, employers, individuals and healthcare providers. We also will explore the current healthcare regulatory environment and the impact of the new healthcare reform program on various healthcare insurance organizations.

HSCI 3350
Epidemiology and Public Health
Course Description

This course offers an introduction to the principles, concepts, and methods of epidemiologic research. Emphasis is placed on understanding epidemiological information, the concept of risk, and the tools used to evaluate health problems and policies at a population level. Topics include the calculation, interpretation and application of measures of disease frequency, association and public health impact; epidemiologic study design and analysis (including the role of chance, bias and confounding); direct standardization of rates, statistical inference and principles of screening. This course also teaches students how to apply epidemiologic methods to critically analyze and interpret public health literature. This is an introduction to the broad concepts of public health practice including the mission, core functions, structure, policy role, program activities, and collaborative endeavors of public health agencies. Theoretical and practical perspectives are studied to illustrate contemporary strategies for health promotion and disease prevention at local, state, and national levels. The course addresses public health issues in the management of various ways a population acquires a disease including water quality, wastewater, municipal and hazardous waste, vector control and air quality.

HSCI 3355
Healthcare Ethics and Law
Course Description

This course is designed to explore the theories, models and principles that serve as guides for ethical behavior within the healthcare context. Ethics is an integral part of every aspect of health careers and this course is encouraged for any individual with a health career objective. The student will explore the complexities created by science and technological advances, the variety of health care settings, and the diversity of patients in their care, all while emphasizing the importance of principled behavior in personal and professional situations. Global issues such as health policy, economics, social, gender, transcultural and spiritual considerations will be addressed.

HSCI 4310
Healthcare Policy
Course Description

This course is an introduction to healthcare policy issues in the U.S. This course will explore the three branches of government and how each of the three shape healthcare policy. The student will also learn to, objectively, score legislation to determine whether it meets the goal of the legislation. We will explore the anticipated and unintended consequences of legislation and look at the political motivations of each party when a healthcare bill is introduced.

HSCI 4320
Biostatistics and the Health Sciences
Course Description

This course introduces students to research method techniques and common statistical applications of importance to healthcare managers. Emphasis is placed on the study of statistical techniques for problem-solving and decision-making including the theoretical and applied statistical and quantitative skills required to understand, conduct and evaluate managerial research. Students will learn to distinguish between types of research (quantitative and qualitative) with an emphasis on the use of quantitative analysis in healthcare organizations. Basic research methods are described, including surveys, observational studies, experimental and quasi-experimental design; and the use of primary and secondary data sets. Statistical techniques for analyzing and interpreting data will include descriptive statistics, hypothesis testing, probability, sampling, t-tests, ANOVA, chi-square analysis, correlation, and linear regression.

HSCI 4330
Health Sciences Research Methods
Course Description

This course provides an introduction to basic methods for undertaking research and program evaluation within health services organizations and systems. In addition to basic methods, the course also provides an overview and emphasis of survey design and evaluation. Students will review completed studies to assist in their understanding of survey methods. This course will aid the student in carrying out policy research, social science research, or program impact evaluation within health delivery systems.

HSCI 4340
Capstone in Health Sciences
Course Description

This capstone course is designed to allow students to demonstrate their competency in applying the knowledge they have gained from this degree program. This course integrates the concepts, theories, and skills learned in their course work. Students will be introduced to the analytical process required to develop skills in the different areas of health sciences.

LDST 3333
Ethical Leadership
Course Description

Ethical Leadership is an analysis of ethics in society and the role of leaders to foster and model ethical behavior. This course is meant to help students understand the role of ethics in leadership and to prepare them to develop and mentor others. Students will be able to explain the theories of ethical leadership and will develop strategies and solutions when faced with case studies dealing with ethical workplace situations. Course content will include the examination of ideas and perspectives in the field of workplace ethics and extend those ideas/perspectives to administrative practice and decision-making. Focus will be to expand capacity for moral inquiry, dialogue, and decision-making in ways that will be useful in professional and personal lives.

LDST 3340
Global Leadership
Course Description

This course provides students with an introduction to what it means to be a global leader. Students will develop the competencies needed to become change agents in what is an increasingly global society. This course will assist students in developing strategies to work with people in various different cultures.

LDST 3360
Leadership and Team Building
Course Description

This course presents the research and practice relevant to improving teamwork in organizations for permanent work groups, temporary project teams and virtual teams, for a variety of purposes, including: Improving productivity, clarifying roles, resolving conflict and adapting to change. Students will model theories and concepts for effective management of teams and groups.

Prerequisite: MGT 3340, MGT 3354, ORGD 3340

LDST 3390
Leadership and Communications
Course Description

This course provides students with the important role that leadership plays in organizational communication and strategy. This course presents the concepts and practice of organizational communication, ranging from individual communications, to how structures and methods influence communication messages.

Prerequisite: MGT 3340, MGT 3354, ORGD 3340

LDST 4310
Leadership and Conflict Resolution
Course Description

This course is focused on the role that leadership plays in successful conflict resolution. It provides an overview of the knowledge, skills and tools that are used by leaders to analyze conflict situations and arrive at successful management in both individual and team settings. Students will learn the appropriate concepts and processes to analyze situations, develop the correct policies, and to negotiate a dispute resolution.

Prerequisite: LDST 3340

LDST 4380
Organizational Leadership Capstone
Course Description

The capstone is an integrative, problem-solving course in which the expertise gained in the major is applied to organizational leadership case studies where the students will evaluate and provide solutions to actual problems. Using critical thinking skills, students will demonstrate the ability to describe and analyze strategic trends in organizational leadership, both personally, in the workplace, and in the global community.

Prerequisite: All 2000, 3000 and 4000 level Leadership Core courses must be taken. Senior level.

MGT 3343
eBusiness Model Development
Course Description

A comprehensive introduction to the concepts of e-Business Model Development is presented. The concepts of e-Business models will be presented that are required to achieve the e-Business goals and targets. Additional discussion for the development, management and maintenance of a successful e-business is reviewed. A Customer Relationship Management System and the Supply-Chain Management System related to e-Business will also be explored.

Prerequisite
MGT 3340

MGT 3345
Leadership in Nonprofit Organizations
Course Description

An introduction to the concepts of nonprofit leadership for the volunteer, staff and member of the Board of Directors is presented.  Further discussion and exploration of issues in managing and evaluating nonprofit organizations to include public and private, educational and faith-based organizations is reviewed.

Prerequisite
ACC 2312 and MGT 3340

MGT 3347
Project Management Method
Course Description

An introduction to the concepts of project management methodologies for use in corporate, non-profit, and government entities is presented. A focus on the strengths/weaknesses between methodologies, and when they are used to effectively execute a project, are discussed and simulated. Students will be introduced to Project Management Process Groups and the Project Management Life Cycles (Tools and Templates) and Strategies.

Prerequisite
MGT 3340

MGT 3353
e-Business Technology Applications
Course Description

A comprehensive study in e-Business Technology Applications that are associated with the advances related to e-Business models taxonomies. The topics of this course will provide the fundamentals strategies of technical applications as it is available for the reactive e-Business enterprise. Students will study e-Business Strategies in Supply Chain Management systems and evaluate and analyze e-Business Integrated Value Chains. Key Technical Foundations of e-Business will also be identified.

Prerequisite
MGT 3343

MGT 3354
Theories and Concepts of Personnel Management
Course Description

Theories and concepts used in managing business personnel. Topics include personnel planning, recruiting, selection, compensation, separation and retirement. Student will get a clear understanding of human resource management concepts, and the opportunity to develop skills important to the performance of human resource management activities.  Cognitive elements emphasized include Knowledge, Comprehension, Application, and Analysis.

Prerequisite: MGT 3340 and Junior Standing

MGT 3357
Project Planning
Course Description

An introduction to the concepts of project planning for use in corporate, non-profit, and government entities is presented. The class will focus on the scheduling, resourcing, and approval processes. The students will learn of the importance of Project Definition and Scope, the foundation for a successful project, Project Planning and the steps that occur in different scenarios. Finally, the Execution and Control of a project will be studies.

Prerequisite
MGT 3347

MGT 4340
Applied Management Practice
Course Description

Course provides students with fundamental skills and insights necessary for success. Course design is based on learning through experience, and is directed toward student involvement in developing and practicing job-relevant managerial skills.

Prerequisite
MGT 3340

MGT 4343
eBusiness Strategies
Course Description

A comprehensive overview to the concepts of e-Business Strategies is presented. The concept of e-Business Strategy is a strategic managerial approach that is required to achieve the main scope, goals and targets of the e-Business domain. Additional in-depth discussion for the planning and implementation of key strategies for the successful e-business is reviewed.

Prerequisite
MGT 3353

MGT 4345
Small Business Management
Course Description

Comprehensive study of management activities associated with entrepreneurial ventures and small businesses. Topics include analysis of opportunities, development of venture strategy, and small business problem solving. Student teams may act as consultants to small businesses. The course affords the student the opportunity to build on core skills developed in the business curriculum including communication, analytical decision making, and research skills.

Prerequisite
MGT 4340, MSC 3371, and Senior Standing

MGT 4346
Quality Assurance
Course Description

Comprehensive study of organizational processes, quality methodologies, the systems perspective and operational issues. As part of the course students will work in a team to evaluate the processes of an organization and suggest processes improvements.

Prerequisite
MGT 4340 and MSC 3370

MGT 4347
Total Quality/Lean Management
Course Description

Fundamental course topics include an exploration of the different types of Quality Methodologies. The course includes a review of concepts, tools, and best practices for each project methodology. These methodologies have been used in corporate, non-profit, and government entities. A focus of what methodology is used for particular types of processes and goals will be reviewed. Tools from Lean Management, Six Sigma, ISO, and Baldridge are introduced and used.

Prerequisite
MGT 3347

MGT 4351
Relationships Between Business and Society
Course Description

Comprehensive study of the relationship between for profit and non-profit organizations and the environment in which they operate. Emphasis is on the analysis of business-society problems and issues and the formulation of appropriate managerial solutions. The course affords the student the opportunity to build on core skills developed in the business curriculum including communication, analytical, and research skills.

Prerequisite
MGT 4355 and Senior Standing

MGT 4355
Organizational Behavior
Course Description

Presentation of theory and research in OB combined with experiential exercises to develop students’ ability to take responsibility for making and living with decisions about their behavior.  Awareness of the realities of organization interdependencies and their consequences for individuals.  Focus is on modifying behavior and predicting the effects upon productivity, satisfaction, and development of individuals as members of the business unit.

Prerequisite
MGT 3340 and Junior Standing

MGT 4357
Project Leadership
Course Description

There will be an exploration of the concepts, tools, models, or methodologies used by successful project leaders. These methodologies have been used in corporate, non-profit, and government entities. A focus on why particular item(s) were successful in that particular context are discussed and researched. High Performance Teams is introduced and used throughout the course.

Prerequisite
MGT 3347 and MGT 4340

MGT 4375
Business Policy and Strategy
Course Description

Capstone course designed to prepare students for the rigorous examinations of their ability to apply their undergraduate education across the entire spectrum of business management and decision making. Students are introduced to the analytical process required to develop strategic options for the decision-making in each of the functional area of business.

Prerequisite
ACC, 2311 ACC 2312, BIS 2321, ECN 2301, ECN 2302, MSC 3370, MSC 3371, GLB 3331, BLW 3317, MKT 3331, MGT 3340, and FIN 3321

MGT 4390
Ethical Practices in Business
Course Description

This course will examine ethical issues in the context of business theory and practice. Course content will include the examination of ideas and perspectives in the field of business ethics and extend these ideas/perspectives to administrative practice and decision making. Focus will be to expand capacity for moral inquiry, dialog, and decision making in ways that will be useful in professional and civic lives.

MKT 3320
Public Relations
Course Description

This course covers all forms of writing for public relations including press releases, public service announcements, features, magazine queries, securing television and radio interviews, coverage memos, media alerts, trade press releases, background stories, and public relations presentations. Students will have exposure to all writing required for a career in public relations.

Prerequisite
COMP 1301 and ENGL 1312

MKT 3353
Social Media
Course Description

This course is an overview of the use of current social media concepts in the professional environment and the effective business impact.  It includes the practical application of social media sites as a component of a business plan including marketing, advertising and public relations.  Course work includes development and implementation of a social media policy and implementation of a social media plan.

Prerequisite
COMP 1301 and MKT 3331nment that affect other business functions.

MKT 3377
Marketing/Buyer Behavior
Course Description

An overall view of the basic perspectives of consumer behavior, this course uses an interdisciplinary approach that integrates the fields of economics, psychology, sociology and anthropology as they relate to marketing and buyer behavior. Students will be familiarized with the basic concepts and issues in consumer behavior; provided an awareness of how consumer behavior concepts are used in marketing practice;; and given the opportunity to think creatively and critically about marketing practices.

Prerequisite
MKT 3331

MKT 4365
Web Analytics
Course Description

The analysis of web metrics, coupled with best practices in online and offline marketing, leads to well-designed websites that facilitate the customer’s experience. The student will be introduced to the basics of web analytics such as tracking referral sources, improving web design and content, and identifying visitor preferences.

Prerequisite
MKT 3353

MKT 4375
Application of Market Research
Course Description

A study of quantitative research procedures and techniques of marketing research projects. Practical application of procedures and techniques is emphasized through class research projects in problem definition, questionnaire design and sampling techniques.

Prerequisite
MKT 3331

MKT 4390
Managerial Functions of Marketing
Course Description

Investigation of the decision-making process of the marketing manager, using the case method. Focus is on the management of the marketing function, strategy formation, execution and control. Management is a key element of integrated marketing communication.  This course introduces students to the basics of case methodology, management of marketing functions, development of a business plan, and more.

Prerequisite
MGT 3340 and MKT 3331

MSC 3301
Statistical Decision Making
Course Description

This course will allow students to make decisions based on data.  Focus will be given to understanding business statistics and how they are used to inform leadership decision making.  Students will gain the knowledge necessary to analyze data, conduct hypothesis testing using management science techniques.

MSC 3370
Statistical Analysis of Business
Course Description

Statistical Analysis of Business is as an introduction to statistical methodology, such as descriptive statistics, probability distributions, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing.  The course utilizes mathematical and statistical techniques in the analysis of managerial problems, the design of new and improved systems, and the implementation of results.

Prerequisite
COMP 1301 and MATH 1304 or equivalent

MSC 3371
Models of Management Science
Course Description

Models of Management Science is an introduction and application of Management Science models used in the analysis of operational process. Course topics include: Optimization Models, Forecasting, Markov Analysis, Decision Theory, PERT/CPM Models, Inventory Analysis, and Queue Theory.

Prerequisite
COMP 1301, MATH 1304 or equivalent, and MSC 3370

ORGD 3340
Organizational Development
Course Description

This course presents the research, practice and ethics relevant to organizational development, including: consulting skills, tools and techniques for analyzing problems, developing, implementing and evaluating organizational development interventions, and ethical issues at each stage of the consulting process.

Prerequisite: BMGT 3340 and BMGT 3354

ORGD 3360
Teambuilding in Organizations
Course Description

This course presents the research and practice relevant to improving teamwork in organizations for permanent work groups, temporary project teams and virtual teams, for a variety of purposes, including: improving productivity, clarifying roles, resolving conflict and adapting to change.

Prerequisite
ORGD 3340.

ORGD 3370
Total Quality Management
Course Description

This course presents the research and practice relevant to employee involvement programs, in particular, TQM, continuous improvement and six-sigma approaches to improving organizational processes, products and services.

ORGD 3390
Communication in Organizations
Course Description

This course presents the concept and practice of organizational communication, ranging from individual communication, to how structures and methods influence communication messages.

Prerequisite
SPCH 2341 and ORGD 3340

ORGD 3395
Organizational Change
Course Description

This Course presents the theory and practice of organizational change, with a particular emphasis on implementing change successfully across a wide range of interventions and managing resistance to change.

Prerequisite
ORGD 3340

ORGD 4330
Organizational Learning
Course Description

This course examines models, theories and practical application of the way an organization learns and adapts to internal and external change, including how to learn from experience, and how knowledge management enhances organizational effectiveness.

Prerequisite: ORGD 3340

ORGD 4350
Leadership in Organizations
Course Description

This course presents the research and practice relevant to leadership in organizations, including: theories of leadership, leadership styles, leadership roles and activities, and skills necessary for effective leadership.

Prerequisite
ORGD 3340 and BMGT 4355. Cross-listed with HRES 4350.

ORGD 4380
Capstone in Organizational Development
Course Description

This is the final course for the BA in Organizational Development. It is an integrative, problem-solving course in which the expertise gained in the major are applied to organizational situations through actual project work or case studies.

Prerequisite
Completion of all major requirement for the Bachelor of Arts in OD. Cross-listed with HRES 4380.

PSYC 1301
Introduction to Psychology
Course Description

Students examine the basic facts and principles of psychology.

PSYC 2320
Scientific Literacy in Psychology
Course Description

This course includes skills for critical evaluation of professional and public literature in psychology; APA writing; and introductory concepts in psychological statistics, research methods, and interpretation of data.

PSYC 2350
Developmental Psychology
Course Description

This course is a survey of theories and current research into the development of the human organism across the entire lifespan.

PSYC 2380
Biology & Behavior
Course Description

Overview of the biological origins of behavior postulating that all emotions, thought processes and behaviors are grounded in biology.

Prerequisite: PSYC 1301

PSYC 3310
Principles of Industrial and Organizational Psychology
Course Description

This course examines psychological principles as they are applied to the industrial/organizational environment. Application of theory related to personnel selection, work environment, personality, motivation, and legal issues related to the work milieu will be investigated.  This course many not be repeated for credit.

Prerequisite
PSYC 1301

PSYC 3315
Group Processes
Course Description

This course examines group development, processes and behaviors. Specific topics include group formation, group structure, power and influence, performance and decision making, leadership, and conflict in group dynamics.  This course many not be repeated for credit.

Prerequisite
PSYC 1301, PSYC 3351, and PSYC 3310

PSYC 3320
Qualitative Methods
Course Description

This course examines qualitative methods appropriate for phenomenological, observational, and ethnological content in psychological and behavioral research.  The course may not be repeated for credit.

Prerequisite
PSYC 1301and PSYC 2320

PSYC 3331
Abnormal Psychology
Course Description

This course examines the psychology of normality and variations, including character disorders, substance abuse, sexual deviations, neuroses, psychoses, techniques, and theories.

Prerequisite: PSYC 1301 and 3 semester hours of PSYC. May be taken as a CLST elective.

PSYC 3351
Social Psychology
Course Description

This course studies individual behavior and attitudes as influenced by other individuals and groups, and considers conformity, mass media, attitude formation and change, attraction, aggression, prejudice, and behavior in groups.

Prerequisite PSYC 1301 or SOC 1311. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective.

PSYC 3353
Personality
Course Description

This course studies the theories of personality, with current research and applications to adult life. It explores therapeutic techniques of theorists and examines growth and mental health of adult personality changes.

Prerequisite: PSYC 1301

PSYC 3380
Applied Statistics for Behavioral Sciences
Course Description

This course examines a variety of research methodologies relevant to the behavioral and social sciences. The course prepares students to critically analyze and apply research methods, explores validity, reliability, and other components of scientific research including basic procedures and designs, laboratory apparatus, and treatment of data.

Prerequisite
PSCY 1301, PSYC 2320, and MATH 1304

PSYC 3385
Multicultural Issues
Course Description

This survey course examines how psychological theory applies in multicultural contexts. The course also examines professional and social issues of psychotherapy, including ethics and public policy. This is a writing intensive course. PSYC 3385 may be taken as a Cultural Studies elective.

Prerequisites: PSYC 1301

PSYC 3450
Quantitative Methods
Course Description

This course examines psychological principles as they are applied to the industrial/organizational environment. Application of theory related to personnel selection, work environment, personality, motivation, and legal issues related to the work milieu will be investigated.  This course many not be repeated for credit.

Prerequisite
PSYC 1301, PSYC 3380, and MATH 1304

PSYC 3450
Quantitative Methods
Course Description

This course studies the theories of personality, with current research and applications to adult life. It explores therapeutic techniques of theorists and examines growth and mental health of adult personality changes.

Prerequisite: PSYC 1301, PSYC 3380, and MATH 1304.

PSYC 3472
Learning
Course Description

This course will examine the various theoretical models including classical conditioning, operant conditioning, and social/observational learning that contribute to relatively permanent changes in behavior.  Laboratory work, using current learning software, will provide hands-on demonstration of the theories discussed in lecture and text.

Prerequisite PSYC 3381 and PSYC 3384

PSYC 4310
Research Design
Course Description

This course emphasizes the use of experimental control and analysis of data for reporting experimental results in the psychological study of human and non-human behavior in a professional manner. Attention is also given to the philosophy of science, formulating research questions, and selecting appropriate statistical tests.  This course many not be repeated for credit.

Prerequisite
PSYC 1301, PSYC 2320, and PSYC 4410

PSYC 4315
Comparative Psychology
Course Description

This course emphasizes the discipline of comparative psychology; it is concerned with study of animal behavior in order to gain deeper understanding of human psychology. Topics include reproductive diversity, animal cognition, adaptation and learning and heredity.  This course many not be repeated for credit.

Prerequisite
PSYC 1301, PSYC 2320, and PSYC 4410

PSYC 4322
Experimental Psychology: Perception
Course Description

This course examines the development of perception and the basic experimentation techniques employed in the study of the detection, recognition, and discrimination.

Prerequisite
PSYC 1301, PSYC 2320, and PSYC 4410

PSYC 4325
Experimental Psychology: Motivation
Course Description

This course examines the basic concepts, theories, and techniques employed in the study of motivation.  This course many not be repeated for credit.

Prerequisite
PSYC 1301, PSYC 2320, and PSYC 4410

PSYC 4331
History of Psychology
Course Description

This course examines the historical antecedents of psychology, including the origins of the various perspectives and schools of thought offered in psychology. Prerequisite: PSYC 1301 and nine hours of upper division psychology courses. This course is a part of the core requirements of the psychology major.

Prerequisite: PSYC 1301 and 9 semester hours of upper-division Psychology courses. Senior Psychology majors only, not open to Psychology minors.

PSYC 4359
Internship in Psychology
Course Description

This course is an educationally directed program under the supervision of faculty and agency professionals, offering the opportunity to acquire skills through experience, and to apply required skills. It requires a minimum of 100 field hours.

Prerequisites: Junior or Senior PSYC Major, PSYC 1301, PSYC 3331 or PSYC 3385, or permission of the instructor.

Student has the option to take PSYC 43CS Capstone Project in Psychology instead of this course.

PSYC 43CS
Capstone Project in Psychology
Course Description

This course is intended to provide student with the opportunity to integrate and synthesize the knowledge and skills they have accrued throughout their coursework in an original comprehensive project.  This course may not be repeated for credit.

Prerequisite
All psychology core and concentration courses

Student has the option to take PSYC 4359 Internship in Psychology instead of this course.

PMBA 6310
Managerial Accounting and Control Systems
Course Description

This course starts by introducing non-accountant managers to the accounting framework, classifications of assets, liabilities, and equities, and the interconnectedness of the financial statements. Special emphasis is be placed on ratio analysis, managing working capital, the cash conversion cycle, and recognizing the importance of accounting concepts such as matching, recognition, accrual, and the accounting period to managerial decision-making. The fundamentals of cost analysis including job-order costing, cost-volume-profit analysis, activity-based costing, and standard costs and variance analysis will be given in depth coverage. Finally, students will examine the role of incentives created by the regulatory environment as well as a firm’s governance structure, compensation policy, and code of ethics on a firm’s internal control systems.

Prerequisite: Principles of Accounting I (ACCT 2311) and II (ACCT 2312), or comparable courses.

PMBA 6311
Managerial Finance
Course Description

In managerial finance, students will be introduced to tools used to measure and evaluate the financial health of a firm for the purpose of improved managerial decision-making. Financial statements are used to conduct ratio analysis, to perform sustainable growth analysis, and to construct percent-of-sales forecasts and cash flow proformas. Students will also explore the merits of using debt versus equity to take advantage of market opportunities. Students will expand upon their knowledge of the time value of money and risk analysis to value investment opportunities in stocks, bonds, and capital budgeting projects including mergers and acquisitions. In depth coverage will be given to valuation tools including discounted cash flow analysis, the weighted average cost of capital, leveraged beta, and market multiples. The assumptions underlying base case analyses will be evaluated using logic, sensitivity analysis, and scenario analysis. Finally, the role of effective corporate governance and ethical decision-making will be covered.

Prerequisite: Principles of Financial Management BFIN3321, or a comparable course.

PMBA 6312
Quantitative Methods and Research
Course Description

Quantitative methods and research applies quantitative methods including decision theory, linear programming, regression analysis, simulation, etc. to real-world business problems in the areas of marketing, finance, and operations. Operations applications will be extended to include concepts related to business process improvement, supply chain management, and job, facility, and office design. Students will also learn techniques to collect, organize, and structure data for analysis including sampling, measurement, and the evaluation of survey worth. This course will culminate in research that applies knowledge to a real-world business problem. Key steps include defining a problem, assessing current knowledge, determining the value of additional information, measuring where information value is high, and using the results to prepare a detailed action plan.

Prerequisite: BMDS 3370 or BMDS 3371 or the equivalent in the past five years (or the instructor’s approval).

PMBA 6313
Managerial Economics and Decision-Making
Course Description

Managerial economics and decision-making applies economics, strategy, and critical thinking processes to solve real-world problems in business. The course begins by introducing students to utility-maximization theory, production, cost, and institutional economic theory to explain how individuals and organizations make decisions in different types of market structures. Special emphasis is placed on the effect that the competitive environment and the role of incentives have on policies regarding price, output, and strategy. Strategic decision-making is further broken down using game theory, Porter’s five forces analysis, and Porter’s four corners analysis. Strategies to get employees and business units to work in the firm’s best interests will also be reviewed. Finally, traditional economics is elaborated upon to review problem-solving models that reduce the negative effects of cognitive biases and decision-making traps.

Prerequisite: Principles of Macroeconomics (ECON 2301) or Principles of Microeconomics (ECON 2302).

PMBA 6314
Management of Information Technology
Course Description

This course introduces students to concepts related to managing the design, development, and implementation of new technologies including computer hardware, software, networks, and telecommunications. Additional topics include e-business systems, enterprise business systems, e-commerce applications, and security and ethical challenges faced by managers of information technology. Emphasis will be placed on developing skills for managing technological transitions, managing industrial research and development, and integrating creativity and organizational learning. Emphasis will also be placed on concepts related to strategic change management including leveraging alliances, networks, relationships, and high-technology ventures to obtain a competitive advantage. Finally, students will be introduced to information technology, security, and intellectual property law to obtain a better understanding of how incentives for technological change are created.

Prerequisite: COMP 1310 (Computer Literacy - undergraduate), BINF 2321 (Introduction to Information Systems - undergraduate); or equivalents.

PMBA 6315
Leading Organizations and Human Resources
Course Description

Managing organizations and human resources explores the values and psychological underpinnings that explain why people behave the way they do. Special emphasis is placed on how managers can use this information to enhance communication to construct effective teams and to lead others by building relationships based on trust and mutual respect. Emphasis is also placed on understanding the relationship between beliefs, emotions, motivation and behavior with implications for situational leaders in the areas of discipline, managing performance, and employee training, development, and empowerment. Students will build upon their understanding of leading human resources by examining policies related to employee selection, training, retention, promotion, compensation, and labor relations. Finally, students will cross-examine the relationships between law and ethics, ethics and leadership, and leadership and cultivating relationships with employees, customers, and the community.

Prerequisite: BMGT 3340, Management Theory and Practice, or a comparable preparatory course.

PMBA 6316
Strategic Marketing, Communications, and Research
Course Description

Students will learn the 5-C framework to support choices related to market segmentation, target market identification, and product positioning. Tactical decision-making related to pricing, product characteristics, promotional activities, distribution channels, brand recognition, communication, and other aspects of the marketing mix will be covered. Special emphasis is placed on techniques used to increase market share including expanding internationally, defining boundaries for a firm’s product portfolio, and the strategic utilization of data. Emphasis will also be placed on formulating, implementing, and evaluating a firm’s integrated marketing communications strategy. Finally, students will do research to solve marketing problems. Key steps include defining the problem, generating hypotheses, selecting methods, analyzing data, and providing recommendations.

Prerequisite: Principles of Marketing (BMKT3331) or a comparable course.

PMBA 6317
Global Strategy, Policy, and Regulation
Course Description

This course starts by providing students an overview of the gains from trade, exchange rates, international trade policy, and business policy as applied to the nation state. Special emphasis is placed on monetary, fiscal, social, and industrial policies as they relate to global strategic decision-making. Students will also be introduced to antitrust law for the purpose of managing the risks associated with pricing decisions, vertical agreements, and horizontal acquisition. The importance of instilling a vision, adhering to a well-articulated value system, and aligning human resources, intangible assets, and boundaries for multiple lines of business to obtain a global competitive advantage will be covered. Students will also explore the benefits to stakeholders of using a balanced scorecard to assess organizational performance. Finally, the strategic implications of cross-national models of corporate governance, market structures, and industry characteristics will be studied.

Prerequisite: International Business Management (BINT 3331) or a comparable course.

PMBA 6320
Investments
Course Description

This course begins by introducing students to the investment environment, financial instruments, and how securities are traded. Emphasis will be placed on securities market mechanics including the role of financial intermediaries, ordering processes, trading securities on margin, and short selling. Students will also be exposed to modern portfolio theory, arbitrage pricing theory, the efficient market hypothesis, and the basics of behavioral finance and the psychology of investing. The capital asset pricing model, bond valuation models, equity valuation models, and valuing venture capital and the IPO process will also be covered. Financial statement analysis, macroeconomic analysis, industry analysis, and technical analysis will be used to further assess investment opportunities. Finally, students will be introduced to the markets for derivative securities including swaps, options, futures, warrants, and convertible bonds.

Prerequisite: PMBA 6311 - Managerial Finance

PMBA 6321
Portfolio Management
Course Description

This course focuses on how to make decisions regarding investment mix and policy, how to match investments to objectives given risk preferences, and how to allocate funds among different asset classes. The portfolio management process, portfolio management theories, and capital market theory will be examined. Special emphasis will be placed on how to distribute capital between risky assets and the risk-free asset in order to construct an optimal risky portfolio. Hedging portfolio risk using derivative securities such as options, futures, and swap contracts will be covered. Students will also be introduced to techniques used to evaluate an investment portfolio’s performance including measuring investment returns, the M2 measure of performance, the information ratio, Sharpe’s ratio, the Treyor ratio, and Jensen’s measure of portfolio performance. Finally, an introduction to the theory of active portfolio management will be provided.

Prerequisite: PMBA 6311 - Managerial Finance

PMBA 6322
Real Estate Investments
Course Description

This course introduces students to real estate as an asset class. Students will also be introduced to present value mathematics for real estate, measuring real estate investment returns, and the basics of real estate valuation using discounted cash flow analysis, multiples-based analysis, and the use of leverage. Micro-level issues including real estate market analysis, real estate market efficiency, income tax considerations, and metrics to assess real estate performance such as the gross rent multiplier, depreciation, land measurements, profitability measures, and vacancy and credit loss will be emphasized. Students will also examine the basics of mortgages, the refinancing decision, and commercial mortgage-backed securities. Finally, students will survey macro-level topics including securitization, real estate investment trusts, and real estate portfolio theory.

Prerequisite: PMBA 6311 - Managerial Finance

PMBA 6330
Applied Data Analysis
Course Description

Data analytics introduces students to methods of data collection, storage, organization, and analysis. The course begins with an overview of descriptive statistics, graphical methods, probability, hypothesis testing, and modeling using linear regression analysis. Exploratory and confirmatory data analysis will be used to examine model specification issues such as dealing with measurement error, handling omitted variable bias, and determining the correct functional form. Students will then learn how to solve problems associated with the violation of the assumptions of linear regression including heteroskedasticity, multicollinearity, and autocorrelation. Finally, an introduction to maximum likelihood estimation for nonlinear, categorical, and limited dependent variable models will be provided. A portion of every class will be dedicated to learning how to use SAS in a lab-like setting to write programs to structure, estimate, and interpret statistical models.

Prerequisite: PMBA 6312 - Quantitative Methods and Research

PMBA 6331
Forecasting Methods in Business
Course Description

Forecasting methods in business introduces students to quantitative techniques that use historical data to make predictions. The course begins with an overview of basic statistical concepts, time series regression analysis, and model building and residual analysis. Emphasis is placed on obtaining point forecasts, prediction intervals for mean values, prediction intervals for individual values, detecting autocorrelation, and assessing forecast error. Students will also learn how to model trend, cyclical, and seasonal variation using polynomial, trigonometric, and growth curve regression models. Forecasting using additive decomposition, multiplicative decomposition, simple exponential smoothing, trend-corrected exponential smoothing, and Holt-Winters methods will also be covered. Finally, students will use Box-Jenkins analysis to identify, estimate, and forecast time series models.

Prerequisite: PMBA 6312 - Quantitative Methods and Research

PMBA 6332
Data Management
Course Description

Data management introduces students to techniques used to systematically collect, organize, store, and manage data. Students will build upon their statistical software programming skills to learn how to more efficiently manage data for analysis. Students will also learn how to implement smart data coding procedures so that their organizations can more intelligently store, organize, access, and analyze information to obtain competitive advantage. Emphasis will be placed on database design, management, and information extraction, particularly mining the internet and exporting and importing data to and from SQL and MS Excel. Finally, students will be introduced to computational procedures used for data mining social media including Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Google+.

Prerequisite: PMBA 6312 - Quantitative Methods and Research

BMGT 6311
Human Resources Management
Course Description

Comprehensive study of current practices in human resources management. Topics include HR planning, recruitment, selection, performance evaluation, training, development, career management, compensation systems, labor relations, and legal constraints.

Prerequisite: Management Theory and Practice (BMGT 3340) or a comparable course.

PMBA 6340
Metrics and Measures of HR
Course Description

This course seeks to introduce students in the field of HR to critical HR metrics generated through data that impacts the organization’s bottom line. This course will include analytics: The systematic collection, analysis, and interpretation of data designed to improve decisions about talent and the organization as a whole. Students will be able to take a strategic view of their organization’s use of HR data to align with the strategic goals, mission, and vision of an organization.

Prerequisite: PMBA 6315 - Leading Organizations and Human Resources

PMBA 6341
Strategic Human Resources Management
Course Description

This course seeks to introduce students in the field of HR to the demands and responsibilities that include organizational leadership and strategic thinking. Students will examine the relationship between how organizational structure relates to implementing strategy, and how an organization’s strategic direction requires developing and assessing an organization’s human capital and creating the capabilities required to support the strategic direction. This course will prepare students to become strategic contributors using both business knowledge and HR skills.

Prerequisite: PMBA 6315 - Leading Organizations and Human Resources

ORGD 6351
Foundations of Organizational Development
Course Description

Course will provide an overview of the discipline of Organizational Development (OD), the phases of OD practice, and in-depth exploration of organizational entry/contracting, diagnosis of problems, and feedback of diagnostic results and action-planning. The ethics and values of the OD professional and self-assessment will be an integrative theme and experience during the semester.

Prerequisites: ORGD 6320 and ORGD 6330. Same as ORGD 7351.

ORGD 6352
Interventions in Organizational Development
Course Description

This course builds on the Foundations of OD, with emphasis on developing and implementing OD interventions, as well as evaluating and sustaining the interventions. Interventions such as human resource development, teambuilding, process improvement and restructuring are explored.

Prerequisite: ORGD 6351. Same as ORGD 7352.

ORGD 6370
Human Performance Improvement
Course Description

This course presents the fundamentals of Human Performance Improvement (HPI). There are multiple reasons for performance problems. HPI is a systematic process designed to understand the causes for the gap between desired performance and actual performance, and to recommend, implement and evaluate solutions to narrow that gap.

ORGD 6360
Leading Change
Course Description

This course presents different frameworks for understanding, implementing and leading organizational change efforts. Key challenges and common mistakes in the change process are highlighted, with best practices introduced to provide the student with the tools to lead small and large change initiatives.

ORGD 63CS
Capstone
Course Description

This project based course builds upon the knowledge, skills and abilities gained and developed in the core and concentration coursework and the student’s employment experiences. Actual organizational issues are analyzed, discussed and possible strategies are evaluated and defended. Student projects are based on organizational issues that are consistent with the student’s area of concentration.

Prerequisite: Final semester or permission of instructor.

ADED 6381
Adult Learning and Development
Course Description

The study of how adults learn in a variety of institutional settings and in learning at their own initiative. Includes theories of learning, development, and participation and the social, political, and ethical concerns of making learning available to all adults who seek it.

ADED 6388
Effective Teams and Groups
Course Description

An examination of and the consequent development of those skills necessary for facilitating learning in order to increase productivity in task-oriented groups of adults. Issues, problems and concepts frequently encountered are addressed, as well as possible solutions.

ORGD 6330
Foundations of Organizational Research and Assessment
Course Description

Course emphasizes the development of quantitative and qualitative organizational research and analysis techniques. Interviewing, participant observation, artifact analysis and principles of survey design, administration and evaluation represent a few of the techniques covered in this course as they relate to organizational assessment and problem solving. Students will become familiar with the concepts, principles, and techniques of research design, data collection, sampling, analysis and reporting. Students will also become familiar with the importance of ethical behavior as it relates to research activities. Students will develop the ability to produce and report descriptive statistics related to organizational survey assessment.

ORGD 6340
Organizational Consulting
Course Description

This course presents the fundamentals of organizational consulting, both as an internal and external consultant, including: the consulting process, tactic and strategies, client management, and ethics of consulting.

PUAD 2310
Introduction to Public Administration
Course Description

Public Administration is the relationship between laws, regulations, appellate decisions and the policies that evolve.  This course will examine how the rapid growth of demands on government has affected the management and budgetary implications of this growth.  Students will examine how public administrators manage the comprehensive system of government regulations and policies.

Prerequisite
GOVT 1315

MGT 4356
Organizational Change
Course Description

This course introduces the discipline of Organizational Development, including definitions, Values, ethics, and OD as a normative process.  Change theory and practice and the role of the change agent/OD professional are examined.  Traditional OD interventions and current applications of OD thought are surveyed.  This course is experiential in nature and incorporates and actions research project.

Prerequisite
MGT 3340 and Junior Standing

ORGD 6320
Organizational Behavior and Learning
Course Description

Emphasis is placed on the contributions of the behavioral sciences toward understanding human behavior in organizations along several dimensions. Using a participative framework, students examine individual, group, and organizational issues relevant to today’s changing workplace. Same as ORGD 7320. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

ORGD 6355
Organizational Change
Course Description

This course examines planned organizational change, defined as a set of activities and processes designed to change individuals, groups, and organizational processes, systems and structures. Intended for individual contributors or managers in positions to anticipate, influence, and generate change.

ORGD 63CS
Capstone
Course Description

This project based course builds upon the knowledge, skills and abilities gained and developed in the core and concentration coursework and the student’s employment experiences. Actual organizational issues are analyzed, discussed and possible strategies are evaluated and defended. Student projects are based on organizational issues that are consistent with the student’s area of concentration. Prerequisite: Final semester or permission of instructor. (Fall, Spring)

HADM 6305
Healthcare Finance I
Course Description

The overall focus of this course is to better understand the role of financial management in the delivery of healthcare, to better manage financial information, and to make smarter financial decisions. This course is designed to expose students to the field of financial and managerial accounting and financial management in healthcare organizations. Emphasis is placed on the skills and competencies necessary for effective health services financial management and accounting as well as the functions performed by, and roles required of, middle level managers. The course will cover the basic principles, concepts, and methods used in the generation of accounting data for financial statement preparation and interpretation; asset, liability, and owner’s equity valuation and their relationship to income determination; using accounting information in organizations for planning, leading, controlling and decision-making; volume-cost-profit analysis, budgeting and cost/revenue variance analysis and decision-making; cost management, apportioning methods and break even analysis.

HADM 6330
Legal and Ethical Issues in Healthcare
Course Description

This course addresses risk management and legal issues pertaining to health services as they relate to providers and consumers within the health care system. It also provides an examination of managerial and clinical ethics as they relate to the provision of health services.

HADM 6340
Quality and Continuous Improvement in Healthcare Organizations
Course Description

The purpose of this course is to guide and facilitate the development of the attitudes, practices and skills necessary for effective continuous improvement within healthcare organizations. After completion of the course students should understand the role and responsibilities of health care managers as they relate to quality, patient safety and continuous improvement and be able to apply the principles and tools of continuous improvement as they pertain to the delivery of healthcare. Specifically, students should be able to analyze and improve organizational processes that impact patient care using the principles and tools of patient-centered continuous improvement.

HADM 6360
Managing Healthcare Organizations
Course Description

The purpose of this course is to provide the student an understanding of management principles for the purpose of achieving health services organizational goals and objectives. Emphasis is placed on the skills and competencies necessary for effective health services management as well as the functions performed by, and roles required of, middle-level managers. Critical skills, competencies and roles covered in the course include those related to motivation, leadership, conflict management, negotiation, problem solving, power and influence, communication, coordination and support service management. Course topics are discussed and explored within the context of key organizational dimensions including environment, structure, process, human resources, performance and adaptability.

HADM 63CS Health Adm
Health Administration Capstone
Course Description

The purpose of this course is to provide students the ability to synthesize the array of management principles and skills acquired during their MHA course of study. The capstone experience will provide the students the ability to critically analyze and compellingly communicate on a current management issue. The class is conducted as a consulting project in which the student works as part of a project team serving a client with specific needs. All students participate in the team as associate members and the professor serves as the team’s senior partner. While the professor will be available to provide guidance and assist the student, this is an opportunity to utilize individual talents and The purpose of this course is to provide students the ability to synthesize the array of management principles and skills acquired during their MHA course of study. The capstone experience will provide the students the ability to critically analyze and compellingly communicate on a current management issue. The class is conducted as a consulting project in which the student works as part of a project team serving a client with specific needs. All students participate in the team as associate members and the professor serves as the team’s senior partner. While the professor will be available to provide guidance and assist the student, this is an opportunity to utilize individual talents and make the decisions necessary to produce a tangible and meaningful product for a client in an existing healthcare organization. Serving in a senior partner role, the professor will help to scope the project(s), ensure adequate breadth and depth of analysis, ask the tough questions, and ensure that the final product adds value to the client and enhances the reputation of the client organization and the University of the Incarnate Word. The professor will also serve as a quality assurance check at different stages of the consulting engagement including the final report and client out-briefs.

PSYC 6335
Personnel Psychology
Course Description

This course examines the research, theories and practices of personnel psychology, including testing reliability and validity, job analysis, selection, performance appraisal training, and legal and ethical issues in employment decision making. Includes an overview of what personnel psychology is as a science and applied discipline, and what personnel psychologists do for the organizations that employ them.

PSYC 6345
Workplace Motivation
Course Description

This course is designed to provide a foundation for understanding work motivation, job satisfaction, and morale. The general theories and primary dimensions of the field of work motivation are introduced. Topics include individual dispositions, expectancies and efficacy, fairness, self-regulation; mechanisms through which the processes are addressed in organizations, specifically goals, incentives, job design and social-interpersonal relationships; and emotions closely linked to motivation.

PSYC 6360
Diversity in Organizations
Course Description

This course explores the structure and dynamics of diversity in organizations and the organizational behavior implications. Considers the individual, societal and organizational dynamics relevant to the 21 st century workplace including ethnicity, race, gender, and other diversity in organizations using social science and other perspectives and uses multiple levels of analysis to investigate theory, research and application regarding the nature of differences and the creation of an inclusive workplace.

PSYC 6373
Assessment and Testing in Workplace Psychology
Course Description

This course examines psychological assessment and testing as it is commonly utilized in the work environment. It includes principles of assessment interviewing, test selection, application, evaluation and report writing, as well as test construction and standardization. Topics include individual, group, organizational assessment and multicultural concerns.

PMBA 6312
Quantitative Methods and Research
Course Description

Quantitative methods and research applies quantitative methods including decision theory, linear programming, regression analysis, simulation, etc. to real-world business problems in the areas of marketing, finance, and operations.  Operations applications will be extended to include concepts related to business process improvement, supply chain management, and job, facility, and office design.  Students will also learn techniques to collect, organize, and structure data for analysis including sampling, measurement, and the evaluation of survey worth.  This course will culminate in research that applies knowledge to a real-world business problem.  Key steps include defining a problem, assessing current knowledge, determining the value of additional information, measuring where information value is high, and using the results to prepare a detailed action plan.

PMBA 6317
Global Strategy, Policy, and Regulation
Course Description

This course starts by providing students an overview of the gains from trade, exchange rates, international trade policy, and business policy as applied to the nation state.  Special emphasis is placed on monetary, fiscal, social, and industrial policies as they relate to global strategic decision-making.  Students will also be introduced to antitrust law for managing the risks associated with pricing decisions, vertical agreements, and horizontal acquisition.  The importance of instilling a vision, adhering to a well-articulated value system, and aligning human resources, intangible assets, and boundaries for multiple lines of business to obtain a global competitive advantage will be covered.  Students will also explore the benefits to stakeholders of using a balanced scorecard to assess organizational performance.  Finally, the strategic implications of cross-national models of corporate governance, market structures, and industry characteristics will be studied.

PMBA 6309
Applied Human Resource Management
Course Description

PMBA 6309 is proposed as an elective course in EAP that replaces BMGT 6311.  This course covers the fundamentals of human resource management from an applied perspective in support of a 9-hour specialization in Human Resource Management.  Finally, a foundational human resource management course is a standard option for students interested in this specialization.

Context: No Prerequisite

ADMN 6360
Management Concepts and Issues
Course Description

ADMN 6360 is designed to develop knowledge and understanding of management functions. Through the use of current periodical literature, lecture and discussion, the course provides examples of management decision-making techniques for dealing with problems that commonly occur in the work setting.

ADMN 6375
Strategic Planning and Policy
Course Description

ADMN 6375 Course provides a comprehensive study of theory and concepts applicable to the strategic management and decision-making process. Case studies and independent research projects provide practice in applying strategic assessment, decision making and implementation processes.

EDUC 6301
Introduction to Research Methods
Course Description

An overview of the common methodological procedures underlying research projects across disciplines; this course is interdisciplinary in scope. Content includes the epistemology of research decisions, knowledge of sources, methods of collecting data, writing, presenting, and criticizing research studies.

EDUC 6306
Philosophical Foundations in Education
Course Description

An examination of the philosophical and theoretical foundations of learning and education from the classical era to contemporary authors.

ADED 6381
Adult Learning and Development
Course Description

The study of how adults learn in a variety of institutional settings and in learning at their own initiative. Includes theories of learning, development, and participation and the social, political, and ethical concerns of making learning available to all adults who seek it.

ADED 6388
Effective Teams and Groups
Course Description

An examination of and the consequent development of those skills necessary for facilitating learning in order to increase productivity in task-oriented groups of adults. Issues, problems and concepts frequently encountered are addressed, as well as possible solutions.

EDUC 6346
Organizational Theory and Development
Course Description

This course uses both a seminar approach and experiential activities to facilitate learning of (a) classical and contemporary organization theory, (b) the importance of culture in influencing organizational effectiveness and efficiency, (c) variables that affect organizational development, (d) organization structure and its relation to organizational culture and organizational development, (e) leadership roles and responsibilities related to effective organizational development and operation. This course may be taken in part through an off-campus learning format to illustrate key concepts. It will provide both theoretical comprehension and skill development.

EDUC 6305
Multicultural Concepts in Education
Course Description

This course provides a theoretical framework for multiculturalism focusing on the divergent American cultural communities including the past, present, and future education of each. The attitudes, values, traditions, and customs effecting education will be examined.

EDUC 6333
Teaching and Learning: Action Research
Course Description

This course provides students with the theoretical framework for understanding key ideas central to recent research on teaching and learning. It explores educational action research as a way to systematically look at educational practices and recording what was done, why it was done, collecting data, analyzing the data and reflecting on how the results might influence future teaching endeavors. It explores ways to apply knowledge of teaching and learning to establishing policy and transforming practice.

EDUC 6343
Curriculum Leadership
Course Description

This course focuses on concepts and strategies necessary to step into a leadership role in the integration and application of technology and learning. This course is an overview of the role of leadership in enhancing organizations through the effective use of technology. In addition to providing an overview of how and why technology impacts organizations, emerging technological roles and expectations will be discussed.

EDUC 6353
Supporting Teachers and Teaching
Course Description

This course prepares teacher leaders for their roles of supporting teachers, conducting assessment for the purpose of improving practice, developing and conducting professional development and exploring how mentoring and peer coaching can support school improvement initiatives.

EDUC 63CS2
Capstone in Education - Teacher Leadership
Course Description

This course is a blend of both academic and experiential learning theory and practice in the educational setting. It examines teacher leadership roles, teacher leadership characteristics, the need for teacher leadership, and the barriers to teacher leadership created by the school structure and the culture of teaching. In addition, this course examines the impact on schools as teachers assume new forms of leadership. Candidates are required to do a 45 hour practicum experience in the area of teacher leadership and complete a Graduate Project. The Graduate Project provides the student with a culminating experience through portfolio, requiring synthesis of skills and knowledge the student has gained. The portfolio requiring both analysis and action is proposed by the student.

ORGL 6301
Principles of Ethical Leadership
Course Description

This course explores the ethical framework of moral behavior and moral influence within which truly effective leadership is rooted.  This course considers the normative theories of leadership, issues of character, the practice of ethical decision making, general ethical perspectives, leading effectively in times of ethical crisis, and creating an ethical organizational climate.

ORGL 6343
Strategic Leadership
Course Description

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of strategic leadership in the context of organizational development.

HADM 6306
Healthcare Finance II
Course Description

This course introduces concepts and develops skills in financial planning and controlling functions including time value of money, pro forma statements, and financial condition analysis. Additional coverage of contemporary financial management topics includes capital budgeting, capital structure analysis, working capital and revenue cycle management, and financial risk. The course content is designed to give health administration managers the skills and abilities to analyze the financial 2018-2019 Graduate Bulletin - 167 - implications of day to day operational decisions. The financial topics covered in this course provide the necessary foundation for understanding and managing the financial aspects of the modern healthcare organization. This course further builds upon the accounting and financial knowledge gained in HADM 6305 and provides the foundation for subsequent courses in the healthcare management curriculum.

ACC 2311
Financial Accounting
Course Description

This course is an introduction to the fundamental concepts of financial accounting as prescribed by U.S. generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) as applied to transactions and events that affect business organizations. Students will examine the procedures and systems to accumulate, analyze, measure, and record financial transactions. Students will use recorded financial information to prepare a balance sheet, income statement, statement of cash flows, and statement of shareholders’ equity to communicate the business entity’s results of operations and financial position to users of financial information who are external to the company. Students will study the nature of assets, liabilities, and owners’ equity while learning to use reported financial information for purposes of making decisions about the company. Students will be exposed to International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS).

BIS 2321
Management of Information Systems
Course Description

This course is designed to familiarize the student with the basic principles, technologies, tools, roles, and management issues involved with the application of information technology; to provide a meaningful team experience working with real-world or simulated clients to successfully analyze information requirements to support an organization’s mission and develop an information system to support those requirements; to provide the opportunity to use microcomputer personal productivity tools to develop business analyses, proposals and other products; to improve business writing and presentation skills; to enable students to continue their own education in areas of information systems technology and applications that may be relevant to their own career success.

Prerequisite
COMP 1301

BLW 3317
Legal Aspects of Business
Course Description

The course provides the student with foundational information about the U.S. legal system and dispute resolution, and their impact on business. The major content areas will include general principles of law, the relationship of business and the U.S. Constitution, state and federal legal systems, the relationship between law and ethics, contracts, sales, torts, agency law, intellectual property, and business law in the global context.

GLB 3331
Analysis of Global Business Opportunities
Course Description

Analysis of business opportunities and political climates, trade barriers, government incentives, currency flow and financial systems and trade practices. Emphasis on current issues and readings. This course is designed to develop the skills and awareness necessary to understand the basic concepts of international business.  The students will be exposed to a wide variety of international trade activities from both the entrepreneurial and multinational corporate points of view.

Prerequisite
ECN 2302 and MGT 3340

MGT 3340
Concepts and Functions of Management
Course Description

Introduction to the theories, concepts and functions of management. Topics include planning, organizing, leading, staffing, controlling, business and managerial ethics and decision making. Management concepts will be applied by analysis of available data and by seeking contemporary opportunities, issues and problem situations.

MKT 3331
Introductory Marketing Concepts and Strategies
Course Description

Introductory course providing comprehensive coverage of marketing concepts and strategies A managerial approach is used that focuses on the practices, problems and decisions of the marketing manager. The course introduces students to the internal and external environment, market structures, and changes in the marketing environment that affect other business functions.

ACC 3313
Cost Accounting
Course Description

Cost determination and cost accounting systems for planning and controlling for decision making in organizations. Students will learn the techniques and practices currently used in business as well as applying specific cost accounting measurements.

Prerequisite
ACC 2312

ACC 3315
Personal Income Tax
Course Description

Introduction to Federal income tax theory with special emphasis on the problems of individuals. Students will  prepare basic individual federal tax returns and illustrate the effects of personal, investment, and business transactions. In addition, students will look at tax planning for the individual.

Prerequisite
ACCT 2312

PUAD 3310
Administrative Law
Course Description

This course examines the laws that are used to administer and regulate government in the US. Students will examine the powers granted to agencies, the rules that are made and the relationship between the agencies and the citizenry. Attention will be paid to the law and the desire for flexibility in governmental oversight.

Prerequisite
GOVT 1315

PUAD 3320
Public Fiscal Management
Course Description

In this course students will learn the fundamentals of budgeting for public, health, and non-profit organizations. Through real-world case studies and assignments, students will gain an understanding of how to use financial information in planning, implementation, reporting, control and analysis.

Prerequisite
MATH 1304

PUAD 4310
Economics for Public Administration
Course Description

This course presents students with an overview of core economic concepts and theories in the context of historical and contemporary public policies that impact both the public and the private sector in a given economy. Students are introduced to key terms, definitions, policies, microeconomic as well as macroeconomic concepts, and dominating philosophies of economics in the context of public issues.

Prerequisite
ECN 2300 or ECN 2302

PUAD 4320
Intergovernmental Relations
Course Description

This course provides information on the dynamic relationship between all different levels of government. These include governments on the local, state and national level. Students will also learn about the relationships between like government entities. Using case work, students will examine and analyze how states and the federal government work together, both successfully and sometimes not successfully. This course will address topics such as the overview of American intergovernmental relations; legal, political, fiscal, and administrative aspects of intergovernmental relations and the issues and challenges associated with them.

Prerequisite
GOVT 1315

PUAD 4330
Public Policy
Course Description

Public Policy covers a wide range of topics, to include the values at the basis of democratic policymaking, the cost- benefits, and the basic tools of policy analysis. This course addresses the institutional arrangements for making public policy decision and the roles of both the non-profit and private sector in making and shaping policy.

Prerequisite
PUAD 2310

PUAD 4390
Capstone in Public Administration
Course Description

The capstone is an integrative, problem-solving course in which the expertise gained in the major is applied to public administration case studies where the students will evaluate and provide solutions to actual problems. Using critical thinking skills, students will demonstrate the ability to describe and analyze strategic trends in public administration. This course will be taken by students in their final semester.

Prerequisite
PUAD 3320, PUAD 4310, PUAD 4320 and PUAD 4330

PSYC 4332
Theories of Counseling and Psychotherapy
Course Description

Students survey the various psychological techniques used to facilitate positive changes in an individual's personality, behavior, or adjustment. Students also explore group therapies.

Prerequisite
PSYC 1301, PSYC 3331

CRIJ 6301
The Psychology of Criminal Justice Leadership
Course Description

This course provides an opportunity to examine the important psychological processes that criminal justice personnel use in interacting with the public. This course will expose students to the sensitivity, understanding, and behaviors that are influenced by others. Students will explore this complex and dynamic landscape to better develop expertise in human behavior and a transformational style geared toward success. There will be a strong emphasis on the rapid and ever-changing landscape of the criminal justice profession, and the importance of possessing a versatile blend of skills, competencies, and traits to be successful leaders. Students will also focus on the need to develop healthy relationships, partnerships, and manage conflict while achieving productive goals utilizing emotional intelligence.

CRIJ 6302
Managing Controversies: The Courage to Lead
Course Description

This course will provide students with a conceptual foundation for applying leadership skills, communication, organization, and self-examination to encourage challenging their own beliefs and assumptions about what constitutes effective criminal justice leadership. Students will evaluate the critical controversies and concerns of contemporary criminal justice. This course will also evaluate the various methods of critical decision-making and innovation in day-to-day criminal justice operations in dealing with controversies. The principled-based concepts of this course will provide students with precise, clear-cut directions, and the necessary tools to fulfill the day-to-day leadership role. This course will identify how challenges and controversies are met and resolved as a criminal justice administrator or as a first responder, and how challenges and controversies can significantly impact an organization or career.

CRIJ 6303
Ethical Decision Making Understanding Biases and Public Perception
Course Description

This course will provide students with the tools to prove in the decision-making processes of criminal justice administrators and managers. In case-studies and challenging scenarios, students will engage in confronting the roles bias and racism occupy in this process, and in doing, explore why biases emerge within the field of criminal justice. Students will be challenged to evaluate the public perception phenomenon concerned with fact-based truth and virtual truth shaped by popular opinion, media coverage and/or reputation. This course will also challenge students to recognize racism, prejudice, and injustice within the field of criminal justice, and identify how to properly manage them in their decision making. Students will explore guidelines and techniques for overcoming limitations and improving the quality of ethical decision making and public perception.

CRIJ 6304
Assessing Crime, Criminal Justice and the Community
Course Description

This course will provide students with assessment strategies on how to measure and predict crime patterns, how to view crime activities, and how to generate reports for a given neighborhood, district, or community. Acquiring a deep understanding of crime data and crime trends are essential preparations for criminal justice leaders. This course will allow students gain this understanding and analyze major sources of crime data in their jurisdictions along with their respective strengths and weaknesses. The utilization of real-world case studies and real-world crime data to effectively illustrate the reality of crime in modern America will be explored. Students will assess the effectiveness of different criminal justice agencies as well as consider the role of community-level protection and control efforts.

HADM 6375
Strategic Planning and Policy in Healthcare
Course Description

The objective of this course is to provide students with current knowledge and skills regarding strategic thinking, planning and management within healthcare organizations. Approaches for conducting environmental assessment and internal analysis are discussed. The integration of strategy, structure and administrative systems is stressed. Students apply strategic management concepts through analysis of organizations, applied projects and special classroom assignments. Application is accomplished through a combination of case study, lecture and participation in class discussion. Completion of projects and assignments requires students to integrate techniques and concepts from this and other program courses.

ORGL 63CS
MSODL Capstone
Course Description

This project based course builds upon the knowledge, skills and abilities gained and developed in the core and concentration coursework and the student’s employment experiences. Actual organizational issues are analyzed, discussed and possible strategies are evaluated and defended. Student projects are based on organizational issues that are consistent with the student’s area of concentration.