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Bachelor of Science in Psychology

The Bachelor of Science degree in Psychology will contribute to a student’s general knowledge and prepare them to pursue advanced degrees in psychology or related disciplines. The program seeks to deliver its curriculum through an interactive and collaborative learning environment that provides its participants with a strong theoretical and scientific foundation in the field of psychology. According to the Cooperative Institutional Research Program Freshmen Survey (Higher Education Research Institute, 2011), psychology was the second most popular undergraduate field in 2011, selected by 5.4% of incoming freshmen. Only general biology was more popular, chosen by 6.2% of incoming freshmen.

Individuals with bachelor’s degrees in psychology possess advanced critical thinking, research and writing skills. Students who do not wish to pursue an advanced degree may find employment in a variety of contexts including public affairs, education, business, or sales. They may also secure employment personnel analysts, employment counselors, managers, interviewers, probation officers, writers or entrepreneurs.

A minor to complement the psychology major in another program is strongly recommended but not required.

Major Requirements

A. UIW Core Curriculum (46 hours)

B. Psychology Core (38 hours)

PSYC 1301
Introduction to Psychology
Course Description

Students examine the basic facts and principles of psychology.

PSYC 2320
Scientific Literacy in Psychology
Course Description

This course includes skills for critical evaluation of professional and public literature in psychology; APA writing; and introductory concepts in psychological statistics, research methods, and interpretation of data.

PSYC 2350
Developmental Psychology
Course Description

This course is a survey of theories and current research into the development of the human organism across the entire lifespan.

PSYC 2380
Biology & Behavior
Course Description

Overview of the biological origins of behavior postulating that all emotions, thought processes and behaviors are grounded in biology.

Prerequisite: PSYC 1301

PSYC 3331
Abnormal Psychology
Course Description

This course examines the psychology of normality and variations, including character disorders, substance abuse, sexual deviations, neuroses, psychoses, techniques, and theories.

Prerequisite: PSYC 1301 and 3 semester hours of PSYC. May be taken as a CLST elective.

PSYC 3351
Social Psychology
Course Description

This course studies individual behavior and attitudes as influenced by other individuals and groups, and considers conformity, mass media, attitude formation and change, attraction, aggression, prejudice, and behavior in groups.

Prerequisite PSYC 1301 or SOC 1311. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective.

PSYC 3353
Personality
Course Description

This course studies the theories of personality, with current research and applications to adult life. It explores therapeutic techniques of theorists and examines growth and mental health of adult personality changes.

Prerequisite: PSYC 1301

PSYC 3380
Applied Statistics for Behavioral Sciences
Course Description

This course examines a variety of research methodologies relevant to the behavioral and social sciences. The course prepares students to critically analyze and apply research methods, explores validity, reliability, and other components of scientific research including basic procedures and designs, laboratory apparatus, and treatment of data.

Prerequisite
PSCY 1301, PSYC 2320, and MATH 1304

PSYC 3385
Multicultural Issues
Course Description

This survey course examines how psychological theory applies in multicultural contexts. The course also examines professional and social issues of psychotherapy, including ethics and public policy. This is a writing intensive course. PSYC 3385 may be taken as a Cultural Studies elective.

Prerequisites: PSYC 1301

PSYC 3450
Quantitative Methods
Course Description

This course examines psychological principles as they are applied to the industrial/organizational environment. Application of theory related to personnel selection, work environment, personality, motivation, and legal issues related to the work milieu will be investigated.  This course many not be repeated for credit.

Prerequisite
PSYC 1301, PSYC 3380, and MATH 1304

PSYC 3472
Learning
Course Description

This course will examine the various theoretical models including classical conditioning, operant conditioning, and social/observational learning that contribute to relatively permanent changes in behavior.  Laboratory work, using current learning software, will provide hands-on demonstration of the theories discussed in lecture and text.

Prerequisite PSYC 3381 and PSYC 3384

PSYC 4331
History of Psychology
Course Description

This course examines the historical antecedents of psychology, including the origins of the various perspectives and schools of thought offered in psychology. Prerequisite: PSYC 1301 and nine hours of upper division psychology courses. This course is a part of the core requirements of the psychology major.

Prerequisite: PSYC 1301 and 9 semester hours of upper-division Psychology courses. Senior Psychology majors only, not open to Psychology minors.

C. Upper Division (15 hours)

PSYC 4332
Theories of Counseling and Psychotherapy
Course Description

Students survey the various psychological techniques used to facilitate positive changes in an individual's personality, behavior, or adjustment. Students also explore group therapies.

Prerequisite
PSYC 1301, PSYC 3331

PSYC 43CS
Capstone Project in Psychology
Course Description

This course is intended to provide student with the opportunity to integrate and synthesize the knowledge and skills they have accrued throughout their coursework in an original comprehensive project.  This course may not be repeated for credit.

Prerequisite
All psychology core and concentration courses

Student has the option to take PSYC 4359 Internship in Psychology instead of this course.

PSYC 4359
Internship in Psychology
Course Description

This course is an educationally directed program under the supervision of faculty and agency professionals, offering the opportunity to acquire skills through experience, and to apply required skills. It requires a minimum of 100 field hours.

Prerequisites: Junior or Senior PSYC Major, PSYC 1301, PSYC 3331 or PSYC 3385, or permission of the instructor.

Student has the option to take PSYC 43CS Capstone Project in Psychology instead of this course.

Plus nine hours from the following:

PSYC 3320
Qualitative Methods
Course Description

This course examines qualitative methods appropriate for phenomenological, observational, and ethnological content in psychological and behavioral research.  The course may not be repeated for credit.

Prerequisite
PSYC 1301and PSYC 2320

PSYC 4310
Research Design
Course Description

This course emphasizes the use of experimental control and analysis of data for reporting experimental results in the psychological study of human and non-human behavior in a professional manner. Attention is also given to the philosophy of science, formulating research questions, and selecting appropriate statistical tests.  This course many not be repeated for credit.

Prerequisite
PSYC 1301, PSYC 2320, and PSYC 4410

PSYC 4315
Comparative Psychology
Course Description

This course emphasizes the discipline of comparative psychology; it is concerned with study of animal behavior in order to gain deeper understanding of human psychology. Topics include reproductive diversity, animal cognition, adaptation and learning and heredity.  This course many not be repeated for credit.

Prerequisite
PSYC 1301, PSYC 2320, and PSYC 4410

PSYC 4322
Experimental Psychology: Perception
Course Description

This course examines the development of perception and the basic experimentation techniques employed in the study of the detection, recognition, and discrimination.

Prerequisite
PSYC 1301, PSYC 2320, and PSYC 4410

PSYC 4325
Experimental Psychology: Motivation
Course Description

This course examines the basic concepts, theories, and techniques employed in the study of motivation.  This course many not be repeated for credit.

Prerequisite
PSYC 1301, PSYC 2320, and PSYC 4410

D. Elective Coursework

Students will work with their adviser to pick a minor. Remaining hours needed to meet 120 hour requirement are elected by student. Transfer credit may be used to fulfill these hours.

Minor

A minor in Psychology requires 15 semester hours in the discipline, including a minimum of six upper-division hours.

PSYC 1301 Introduction to Psychology
Plus 12 additional semester hours in PSYC; 6 of which must be upper division